Georgetown Lake Homeowners Association

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WHAT DOES THE GEORGETOWN LAKE HOME OWNER’S ASSOCIATION DO FOR OUR COMMUNITY?

 

  1. WaterWe are on a committee that advise Granite County on lake management.  We cosponsored and participated in a Clean Lake Study to assure our lake is healthy. It Is!

  2. Zoning: Homeowners at the lake wanted a “soft touch” zoning or development rules so we guided that process through meeting and hearings until that was achieved. ( 3 years). 

  3. Wildlife ManagementWe work closely with FWP and other groups to address wildlife issues in our area. This includes public presentations and promoting good management practices such as bear proof garbage cans. 

  4. Volunteer Fire Department: We support the Georgetown Lake Fire Department with equipment donations and funding for equipment for the Emergency Response Unit.

  5. Planning Board: We have had a member sit on the Granite County Planning Board to guide development at the lake.

  6. Meetings: GLHA holds two meetings at the lake every year to keep members informed of current issues. There are usually speakers from various agencies to inform us on topics of interest. 

  7. Watershed: GLHA has a representative sit on the Granite County Watershed Committee. This group is designed to preserve and protect the watershed including Georgetown Lake. They also promote maintaining our rural lifestyle. 

  8. Flow Gauges: GLHA also shares in the cost of maintaining a USGS flow gauge on Flint Creek. This measures the water coming out of Georgetown Lake on a real time basis. This enables us to monitor management of the reservoir by Granite County. 

  9. Membership: We welcome new members to help us with these endeavors. The cost of membership is $25. You can send a check to GLHA, PO Box 643 , Anaconda, Montana 59711. Include your address at the lake and for future mailings, email is appreciated also. 
     

 
 

Links

 

Services

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Georgetown Lake Volunteer Fire Department

The fire hall can now host your community events including meetings and weddings.  Please contact Fred to discuss your ideas as to how you might use the fire hall.

Fred Bjorklund, Fire Chief

406-560-3260

Anaconda Sheriff Dept

Please call 911 if a crime is in progress, someone is hurt or threatened, a weapon has been used or is present, or for any other emergency situation.

If you have an emergency. please dial 911

Emergency Medical Technician (EMT)
Phone: 911
 

The Lake

Updated  October  1, 2021

 Lake Elevation  LAST Month on September 1, 2021   6428.06     

 

The water surface elevation sits at 6427.44 feet this morning (October 1, 2021), and ended yesterday (September 30) at 6427.45 feet.  That is the lowest September 30 reading since 2000. The average or normal level at this time would be about 6428.60 feet.  Reservoir outflow as measured at the USGS station has been held at about 27 cfs through September, averaging 26.9 cfs (provisional data).  Just a reminder that data logged by the USGS undergoes review at the end of the year and is typically adjusted for accuracy; until then, data are considered preliminary or provisional.
 
So, if outflows have not been above 30 cfs all summer, why is the lake more than one foot below normal?  Statewide, this past summer was brutal in terms of precipitation.  Additionally, above-normal air temperatures increased evaporation and plant use of water.  Precipitation as measured at Peterson Meadows tells the story.  For the period March through September, accumulated precipitation was only 48% of normal.  That means Peterson Meadows received 9.07 inches less than usual.  For the summer period alone, June through September, precipitation was only 29% of normal, which is 5.76 inches less than usual.
 
Snowpack in the upper basin was not bad at all last winter.  Peterson Meadows SNOTEL peaked at about 81% of normal snow water equivalent, and Warm Springs peaked at about 107% of normal.  The problem was really a lack of spring and summer rains.
 
From September 22 through September 30, the water surface dropped 0.12 feet in a very steady manner.  The average drop per day then calculates to 0.015 feet per day, with no precipitation coming in.  If outflow is held steady and there is no precipitation, the lake level will drop to around 6427.23 feet by October 15, which is traditionally the end of irrigation season.  Normally the water surface would be near 6428.20 feet or so in mid-October and 6428.30 or so by October 31. 
 
As soon as possible, likely October 16, reservoir outflows should be reduced in order to build storage for the coming winter.  The goal is to get to at least 6428.20 feet by the time the lake freezes over, which is typically in late November.  Low water equates to low dissolved oxygen which can cause winter fish kills, which nobody wants to happen.
 
One bright spot is the Climate Prediction Center forecast.  For October through January, the forecast shows near normal air temperatures and elevated chances of above-normal precipitation.
 
I will continue to monitor conditions and issues updates as needed.
Thanks, Dave

 

D. Amman, Montana DNRC, 406-444-6648

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Wildlife

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Protecting Montana's Waters
John O'Bannon AIS Area Supervisor for Southwest Montana, with the Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks AIS Bureau, Presented a slide show on protecting Montana's lakes, rivers and streams from invasive mussels, snails and fish at the August Georgetown Lake Homeowners Association meeting and BBQ.  

For more information please contact:
John O'Bannon
406.210.5054
john.o'bannon@mt.gov  
cleandraindrymt.com


To help stop the spread of invasive aquatic species:

1. Help spread the Clean, Drain, Dry message
2. Boats traveling on the Interstate should be inspected prior to launch
3. Aquarium dumping must be STOPPED! Aquariums fish and plants can cause serious damage to our lakes and streams.

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Moose
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BEAR PROOF GARBAGE CAN PROJECT

To order your own bear proof garbage can send an email to

KJOHNSTON@PEOPLEANDCARNIVORES.ORG

Kim Johnston 406-599-9424

COST $80.00  

FOR SPRING 2020 DELIVERY

Send payment with address information to:

People and Carnivores

P.O. Box 6733
Bozeman, MT 59771

Phone: (406) 587-3389
Fax: (406) 587-3178
info@peopleandcarnivores.org

Help Protect Our Bears

 

 Gallery
 

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Old Works Golf
Hiking
Winter Sport
Fishing Rod
Fishing Boat
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